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One Child’s Village: Food Program


Brief Intro:

Food is fundamental to life. For many orphans in Kenya good nutritious meals are very rare. Poverty makes it difficult for families to feed their children more than 2 or 3 meals per week. A hungry child also has difficulty learning in class. You can create an enormous impact in the lives of these children by helping us provide a small breakfast and full lunch every day for hundreds of orphans, at a very small cost.


Project Summary:

It has never been easier to make such an incredible difference in the lives of those in the world who cannot access even the most basic of human needs. All of the food is purchased from local farmers or markets as they can provide better prices for the large quantities that we require. It is beneficial to create these relationships in the communities and support the locals who are struggling to overcome poverty themselves.


Project Details:

For the cost of an average monthly grocery bill for a middle-class family of five in Canada, you can feed an entire school of 200 orphaned children and their 10 teachers for one month. For only $700 (less than $8 per month, per child) you can deliver a nutritious meal-and-a-half every day to every child and their teacher in the school. It has never been easier to make such an incredible difference in the lives of those in the world who cannot access even the most basic of human needs. There are certain local foods which make up the ingredients of the meals provided to students. Our daily menu consists of: Breakfast – porridge and tea. Lunch – Kenya beans (very large), sukuma wiki* (this is a local version of kale or greens), maize (ground corn flour or corn meal), and Kenyan rice. These are rotated on a daily basis and will produce a large boost of nutrition for the children. All of the food is purchased from local farmers or markets as they can provide better prices for the large quantities that we require. It is beneficial to create these relationships in the communities and support the locals who are struggling to overcome poverty themselves.

* “Sukuma wiki” is a Swahili term given to these nutritious kale-like vegetables and translates as “to push the week”. That is, Kenyans love to eat meat but often have access to it only once a week or less, so they use these greens to fill their plate daily in order to “push” them through to the end of the week when they might be able to get some meat.

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